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Disk Partitions Commands in Ubuntu/Debian Server – LINUX Tools

1. fdisk

The fdisk command can display the partitions and details like file system type, model, zise. In Ubuntu 20.04 report the size of each partitions, but not in all Linux distributions!

@ sudo fdisk -l
Disk /dev/nvme0n1: 232.91 GiB, 250059350016 bytes, 488397168 sectors
Disk model: Samsung SSD 970 EVO 250GB
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: gpt
Disk identifier: 935DF0C6-01CF-4BC6-B8E4-9675A5EBC9B6

Device           Start       End   Sectors   Size Type
/dev/nvme0n1p1    2048   1050623   1048576   512M EFI System
/dev/nvme0n1p2 1050624   3147775   2097152     1G Linux filesystem
/dev/nvme0n1p3 3147776 488394751 485246976 231.4G Linux filesystem


Disk /dev/sda: 238.49 GiB, 256060514304 bytes, 500118192 sectors
Disk model: Samsung SSD 850
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: gpt
Disk identifier: 47D26543-4BD4-4427-935F-A40AA9D848EF

Device     Start       End   Sectors   Size Type
/dev/sda1   2048 500117503 500115456 238.5G Linux filesystem
2. sfdisk

It is another utility with a similar purpose to fdisk command, but with more features.
Ex. Can display the size of each partition in bytes:

@ sudo sfdisk -s
/dev/loop0:     56692
/dev/loop1:     56712
/dev/loop2:     69376
/dev/loop3:     30600
/dev/loop4:     31808
/dev/loop5:     72984
/dev/nvme0n1: 244198584
/dev/sda: 250059096
/dev/sdb: 2930266584
/dev/sdc: 1953481728
/dev/sdd: 3907018584
/dev/sde: 2930266584
/dev/mapper/ubuntu--vg-ubuntu--lv: 121311232
total: 12336920564 blocks
3. cfdisk

is a Linux partition editor with an interactive user interface. It can be used to list existing partitions, as well as to create or modify them.

Here is an example of how to use cfdisk command to list the partitions on disk /dev/nvme0n1

@ sudo cfdisk /dev/nvme0n1

cfdisk-utility disk ubuntu-server-linux

4. parted

is another command line utility for listing partitions and modifying them if necessary.
Here is an example of using parted command that lists the partition details:

@ sudo parted -l
Model: ATA Samsung SSD 850 (scsi)
Disk /dev/sda: 256GB
Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B
Partition Table: gpt
Disk Flags:

Number  Start   End    Size   File system  Name     Flags
 1      1049kB  256GB  256GB  ext4         primary

Model: WD Elements 10B8 (scsi)
Disk /dev/sdc: 2000GB
Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B
Partition Table: msdos
Disk Flags:

Number  Start   End     Size    Type     File system  Flags
 1      1049kB  2000GB  2000GB  primary  ntfs

Model: ATA HGST HUS726040AL (scsi)
Disk /dev/sdd: 4001GB
Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B
Partition Table: gpt
Disk Flags:

Number  Start   End     Size    File system  Name     Flags
 1      1049kB  4001GB  4001GB  ext4         primary

Model: Samsung SSD 970 EVO 250GB (nvme)
Disk /dev/nvme0n1: 250GB
Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B
Partition Table: gpt
Disk Flags:

Number  Start   End     Size    File system  Name  Flags
 1      1049kB  538MB   537MB   fat32              boot, esp
 2      538MB   1612MB  1074MB  ext4
 3      1612MB  250GB   248GB

With parted you can delete, modify, create partitions on a physical disk:

@ sudo parted -h
Usage: parted [OPTION]... [DEVICE [COMMAND [PARAMETERS]...]...]
Apply COMMANDs with PARAMETERS to DEVICE.  If no COMMAND(s) are given, run in
interactive mode.

OPTIONs:
  -h, --help                      displays this help message
  -l, --list                      lists partition layout on all block devices
  -m, --machine                   displays machine parseable output
  -s, --script                    never prompts for user intervention
  -v, --version                   displays the version
  -a, --align=[none|cyl|min|opt]  alignment for new partitions

COMMANDs:
  align-check TYPE N                       check partition N for TYPE(min|opt) alignment
  help [COMMAND]                           print general help, or help on COMMAND
  mklabel,mktable LABEL-TYPE               create a new disklabel (partition table)
  mkpart PART-TYPE [FS-TYPE] START END     make a partition
  name NUMBER NAME                         name partition NUMBER as NAME
  print [devices|free|list,all|NUMBER]     display the partition table, available devices, free space, all found partitions, or a particular partition
  quit                                     exit program
  rescue START END                         rescue a lost partition near START and END
  resizepart NUMBER END                    resize partition NUMBER
  rm NUMBER                                delete partition NUMBER
  select DEVICE                            choose the device to edit
  disk_set FLAG STATE                      change the FLAG on selected device
  disk_toggle [FLAG]                       toggle the state of FLAG on selected device
  set NUMBER FLAG STATE                    change the FLAG on partition NUMBER
  toggle [NUMBER [FLAG]]                   toggle the state of FLAG on partition NUMBER
  unit UNIT                                set the default unit to UNIT
  version                                  display the version number and copyright information of GNU Parted

Report bugs to [email protected]

A single command line to create an ext4 primary partition on /dev/sdd disk:

@ sudo parted /dev/sdd -a opt mkpart primary ext4 2048s 4001GB

Previously, however, it is necessary for the existing partitions to be deleted using the rm command from the parted, the existing space must be sufficient for the above command, approximately 4Tb.

Use this command carefully because if you choose the wrong disk you worked on or delete the wrong partitions, you may lose all information!

5. df

is a disk utility that prints details about mounted file systems. The list generated by df command even includes file systems that are not “real” disk partitions, like tmpfs, udev :

@ df -h
Filesystem                         Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
udev                               7.7G     0  7.7G   0% /dev
tmpfs                              1.6G  1.5M  1.6G   1% /run
/dev/mapper/ubuntu--vg-ubuntu--lv  114G   65G   43G  61% /
tmpfs                              7.8G     0  7.8G   0% /dev/shm
tmpfs                              5.0M     0  5.0M   0% /run/lock
tmpfs                              7.8G     0  7.8G   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
/dev/nvme0n1p2                     976M  199M  711M  22% /boot
/dev/nvme0n1p1                     511M  7.8M  504M   2% /boot/efi
/dev/loop0                          56M   56M     0 100% /snap/core18/1932
/dev/sde1                          2.8T  2.5T  297G  90% /srv/TOSHIBA-3T-ENTERPRISE
/dev/loop1                          56M   56M     0 100% /snap/core18/1944
/dev/loop2                          68M   68M     0 100% /snap/lxd/18150
/dev/sdd1                          3.6T  224G  3.2T   7% /srv/HGST-4T
/dev/sdb1                          2.7T  2.4T  169G  94% /srv/TOSHIBA-3T-V300
/dev/loop3                          30M   30M     0 100% /snap/snapd/8542
/dev/loop4                          32M   32M     0 100% /snap/snapd/10492
/dev/loop5                          72M   72M     0 100% /snap/lxd/16099
/dev/sdc1                          1.9T  1.7T  123G  94% /srv/WD-2T-USB
/dev/sda1                          234G   11G  212G   5% /srv/SAMSUNG-850-PRO
tmpfs                              1.6G     0  1.6G   0% /run/user/1001

Use linux grep command to filter out real hard disk partitions/file systems,

Here’s an example of how to find only file systems that are actual devices or partitions and start with a /dev :

@ df -h | grep ^/dev
/dev/mapper/ubuntu--vg-ubuntu--lv  114G   65G   43G  61% /
/dev/nvme0n1p2                     976M  199M  711M  22% /boot
/dev/nvme0n1p1                     511M  7.8M  504M   2% /boot/efi
/dev/loop0                          56M   56M     0 100% /snap/core18/1932
/dev/sde1                          2.8T  2.5T  297G  90% /srv/TOSHIBA-3T-ENTERPRISE
/dev/loop1                          56M   56M     0 100% /snap/core18/1944
/dev/loop2                          68M   68M     0 100% /snap/lxd/18150
/dev/sdd1                          3.6T  224G  3.2T   7% /srv/HGST-4T
/dev/sdb1                          2.7T  2.4T  169G  94% /srv/TOSHIBA-3T-V300
/dev/loop3                          30M   30M     0 100% /snap/snapd/8542
/dev/loop4                          32M   32M     0 100% /snap/snapd/10492
/dev/loop5                          72M   72M     0 100% /snap/lxd/16099
/dev/sdc1                          1.9T  1.7T  123G  94% /srv/WD-2T-USB
/dev/sda1                          234G   11G  212G   5% /srv/SAMSUNG-850-PRO

or print only disk drive starting with /dev/sd* and stick the first line about information

@ df | grep -E 'Use%|dev/sd'
Filesystem                         1K-blocks       Used  Available Use% Mounted on
/dev/sde1                         2930265088 2619654144  310610944  90% /srv/TOSHIBA-3T-ENTERPRISE
/dev/sdd1                         3844639728  234504604 3414767908   7% /srv/HGST-4T
/dev/sdb1                         2883219632 2560507192  176182804  94% /srv/TOSHIBA-3T-V300
/dev/sdc1                         1953480700 1824711644  128769056  94% /srv/WD-2T-USB

Show only the file systems that are user-accesible devices or partitions, start with /dev/sd* or /dev/nvme*

@ df -h | grep -E ^/dev/'(sd|nvme)'
/dev/nvme0n1p2                     976M  199M  711M  22% /boot
/dev/nvme0n1p1                     511M  7.8M  504M   2% /boot/efi
/dev/sde1                          2.8T  2.5T  297G  90% /srv/TOSHIBA-3T-ENTERPRISE
/dev/sdd1                          3.6T  224G  3.2T   7% /srv/HGST-4T
/dev/sdb1                          2.7T  2.4T  169G  94% /srv/TOSHIBA-3T-V300
/dev/sdc1                          1.9T  1.7T  123G  94% /srv/WD-2T-USB
/dev/sda1                          234G   11G  212G   5% /srv/SAMSUNG-850-PRO
6. lsblk

lists all storage blocks, which include disk partitions & optical drives. Details include the total size of the partition and mount point, if any.

@ lsblk
NAME                      MAJ:MIN RM   SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT
loop0                       7:0    0  55.4M  1 loop /snap/core18/1932
loop1                       7:1    0  55.4M  1 loop /snap/core18/1944
loop2                       7:2    0  67.8M  1 loop /snap/lxd/18150
loop3                       7:3    0  29.9M  1 loop /snap/snapd/8542
loop4                       7:4    0  31.1M  1 loop /snap/snapd/10492
loop5                       7:5    0  71.3M  1 loop /snap/lxd/16099
sda                         8:0    0 238.5G  0 disk
└─sda1                      8:1    0 238.5G  0 part /srv/SAMSUNG-850-PRO
sdb                         8:16   0   2.7T  0 disk
└─sdb1                      8:17   0   2.7T  0 part /srv/TOSHIBA-3T-V300
sdc                         8:32   0   1.8T  0 disk
└─sdc1                      8:33   0   1.8T  0 part /srv/WD-2T-USB
sdd                         8:48   0   3.7T  0 disk
└─sdd1                      8:49   0   3.7T  0 part /srv/HGST-4T
sde                         8:64   0   2.7T  0 disk
└─sde1                      8:65   0   2.7T  0 part /srv/TOSHIBA-3T-ENTERPRISE
nvme0n1                   259:0    0 232.9G  0 disk
├─nvme0n1p1               259:1    0   512M  0 part /boot/efi
├─nvme0n1p2               259:2    0     1G  0 part /boot
└─nvme0n1p3               259:3    0 231.4G  0 part
  └─ubuntu--vg-ubuntu--lv 253:0    0 115.7G  0 lvm  /

Show filterd only real disk-device with details like SIZE:

@ lsblk | grep -E 'SIZE|disk'
NAME                      MAJ:MIN RM   SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT
sda                         8:0    0 238.5G  0 disk
sdb                         8:16   0   2.7T  0 disk
sdc                         8:32   0   1.8T  0 disk
sdd                         8:48   0   3.7T  0 disk
sde                         8:64   0   2.7T  0 disk
nvme0n1                   259:0    0 232.9G  0 disk

Show filterd only partition with details like SIZE, MOUNTPOINT:

@ lsblk | grep -E 'SIZE|part'
NAME                      MAJ:MIN RM   SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT
└─sda1                      8:1    0 238.5G  0 part /srv/SAMSUNG-850-PRO
└─sdb1                      8:17   0   2.7T  0 part /srv/TOSHIBA-3T-V300
└─sdc1                      8:33   0   1.8T  0 part /srv/WD-2T-USB
└─sdd1                      8:49   0   3.7T  0 part /srv/HGST-4T
└─sde1                      8:65   0   2.7T  0 part /srv/TOSHIBA-3T-ENTERPRISE
├─nvme0n1p1               259:1    0   512M  0 part /boot/efi
├─nvme0n1p2               259:2    0     1G  0 part /boot
└─nvme0n1p3               259:3    0 231.4G  0 part

using “-o” option can be used to specify the columns to display: UUID , Model of device and only disk/partition (not loop, lvm)

@ lsblk -o PATH,SIZE,TYPE,MOUNTPOINT,UUID,MODEL | grep -E 'MODEL|part|disk'
PATH                                SIZE TYPE MOUNTPOINT                 UUID                                   MODEL
/dev/sda                          238.5G disk                                                                   Samsung_SSD_850
/dev/sda1                         238.5G part /srv/SAMSUNG-850-PRO       69c930c7-8035-45bc-ac5d-e52bf39a107f
/dev/sdb                            2.7T disk                                                                   TOSHIBA_HDWU130
/dev/sdb1                           2.7T part /srv/TOSHIBA-3T-V300       8f1560d4-dac7-42f6-835a-adbaf0df2fe1
/dev/sdc                            1.8T disk                                                                   Elements_10B8
/dev/sdc1                           1.8T part /srv/WD-2T-USB             F474B7AA74B76DCC
/dev/sdd                            3.7T disk                                                                   HGST_HUS726040AL
/dev/sdd1                           3.7T part /srv/HGST-4T               4b98c45d-b7cf-4bbc-819e-7283b3f5247e
/dev/sde                            2.7T disk                                                                   TOSHIBA_MG03ACA3
/dev/sde1                           2.7T part /srv/TOSHIBA-3T-ENTERPRISE FCCB-C31F
/dev/nvme0n1                      232.9G disk                                                                   Samsung SSD 970 EVO 250GB
/dev/nvme0n1p1                      512M part /boot/efi                  DC9D-9B44
/dev/nvme0n1p2                        1G part /boot                      480d97d7-9613-43f0-aa10-089988d8ea04
/dev/nvme0n1p3                    231.4G part                            Qp4dGc-yfAo-hKMR-00As-Lwr1-O60b-gEBO7o
7. blkid

prints the attributes of the block device (partitions and storage media) such as uuid and the type of file system. Note: Does not report the space on the partitions.

@ blkid
/dev/nvme0n1p1: UUID="DC9D-9B44" TYPE="vfat" PARTUUID="8c33a40d-1614-43b0-beb6-ed1dd683f272"
/dev/nvme0n1p2: UUID="480d97d7-9613-43f0-aa10-089988d8ea04" TYPE="ext4" PARTUUID="d8749998-ec49-497f-931d-fb04edba1675"
/dev/nvme0n1p3: UUID="Qp4dGc-yfAo-hKMR-00As-Lwr1-O60b-gEBO7o" TYPE="LVM2_member" PARTUUID="42f2aba8-030a-427e-8671-3efcdc94edd0"
/dev/sda1: LABEL="SAMSUNG-850-PRO" UUID="69c930c7-8035-45bc-ac5d-e52bf39a107f" TYPE="ext4" PARTLABEL="primary" PARTUUID="ce799da8-2abe-49b4-83ce-2b1d4dedcb4d"
/dev/sdb1: LABEL="topmovie" UUID="8f1560d4-dac7-42f6-835a-adbaf0df2fe1" TYPE="ext4" PARTLABEL="primary" PARTUUID="2afb0def-dc44-4483-8896-1a55c1974f6e"
/dev/sdc1: LABEL="W-MEDIA" UUID="F474B7AA74B76DCC" TYPE="ntfs" PARTUUID="aee4ad06-01"
/dev/sdd1: LABEL="HGST-4TB" UUID="4b98c45d-b7cf-4bbc-819e-7283b3f5247e" TYPE="ext4" PARTLABEL="primary" PARTUUID="b1883b52-a37d-49db-903e-0cceb188f0b8"
/dev/sde1: LABEL="MOVIE2020" UUID="FCCB-C31F" TYPE="exfat" PTTYPE="atari" PARTLABEL="Basic data partition" PARTUUID="ee66f8e9-5073-4757-905e-ac86406ae9e2"
/dev/mapper/ubuntu--vg-ubuntu--lv: UUID="ad2242f7-dc17-44ad-b977-897c77a186d8" TYPE="ext4"
/dev/loop0: TYPE="squashfs"
/dev/loop1: TYPE="squashfs"
/dev/loop2: TYPE="squashfs"
/dev/loop3: TYPE="squashfs"
/dev/loop4: TYPE="squashfs"
/dev/loop5: TYPE="squashfs"

you can list device with filter by type partition, example for ext4:

@ blkid -t TYPE=ext4
/dev/nvme0n1p2: UUID="480d97d7-9613-43f0-aa10-089988d8ea04" TYPE="ext4" PARTUUID="d8749998-ec49-497f-931d-fb04edba1675"
/dev/sda1: LABEL="SAMSUNG-850-PRO" UUID="69c930c7-8035-45bc-ac5d-e52bf39a107f" TYPE="ext4" PARTLABEL="primary" PARTUUID="ce799da8-2abe-49b4-83ce-2b1d4dedcb4d"
/dev/sdb1: LABEL="topmovie" UUID="8f1560d4-dac7-42f6-835a-adbaf0df2fe1" TYPE="ext4" PARTLABEL="primary" PARTUUID="2afb0def-dc44-4483-8896-1a55c1974f6e"
/dev/sdd1: LABEL="HGST-4TB" UUID="4b98c45d-b7cf-4bbc-819e-7283b3f5247e" TYPE="ext4" PARTLABEL="primary" PARTUUID="b1883b52-a37d-49db-903e-0cceb188f0b8"
/dev/mapper/ubuntu--vg-ubuntu--lv: UUID="ad2242f7-dc17-44ad-b977-897c77a186d8" TYPE="ext4"
8. mke2fs

is used to create an ext2, ext3, or ext4 filesystem, usually in a disk partition.

example with format disk partition in ext4 type:

@ mke4fs -t ext4 /dev/sdd1

this last command is similar with next mkfs command:

@ mkfs.ext4 /dev/sdd1
9. mkfs

is used to format a Linux file system on a device, usually a hard disk partition, and actuality is simply a front-end for the various file system builders (mkfs.fstype) available under Linux OS.

@ mkfs.ext2 /dev/sda1
@ mkfs.ext3 /dev/sdb1
@ mkfs.ext4 /dev/sdd1
10. tune2fs

adjust tunable file system parameters on the ext2, ext3 or ext4 Linux file systems.

The current values of these options can be displayed by using the -l option :

@ tune2fs -l /dev/sdd1
tune2fs 1.45.5 (07-Jan-2020)
Filesystem volume name:   HGST-4TB
Last mounted on:          /srv/HGST-4T
Filesystem UUID:          4b98c45d-b7cf-4bbc-819e-7283b3f5247e
Filesystem magic number:  0xEF53
Filesystem revision #:    1 (dynamic)
Filesystem features:      has_journal ext_attr resize_inode dir_index filetype needs_recovery extent 64bit flex_bg sparse_super large_file huge_file dir_nlink extra_isize metadata_csum
Filesystem flags:         signed_directory_hash
Default mount options:    user_xattr acl
Filesystem state:         clean
Errors behavior:          Continue
Filesystem OS type:       Linux
Inode count:              244195328
Block count:              976754176
Reserved block count:     48837708
Free blocks:              904226234
Free inodes:              244195110
First block:              0
Block size:               4096
Fragment size:            4096
Group descriptor size:    64
Reserved GDT blocks:      1024
Blocks per group:         32768
Fragments per group:      32768
Inodes per group:         8192
Inode blocks per group:   512
Flex block group size:    16
Filesystem created:       Tue Dec 22 13:57:55 2020
Last mount time:          Wed Dec 23 14:41:50 2020
Last write time:          Wed Dec 23 14:44:23 2020
Mount count:              3
Maximum mount count:      -1
Last checked:             Tue Dec 22 13:57:55 2020
Check interval:           0 ()
Lifetime writes:          284 GB
Reserved blocks uid:      0 (user root)
Reserved blocks gid:      0 (group root)
First inode:              11
Inode size:               256
Required extra isize:     32
Desired extra isize:      32
Journal inode:            8
Default directory hash:   half_md4
Directory Hash Seed:      eea7c603-9c96-43ba-907b-ad22a23d3431
Journal backup:           inode blocks
Checksum type:            crc32c
Checksum:                 0x5a7626e9

Example to determine the block size of an etx2/ext3/ext4 partition on Linux, filter output with grep:

@ tune2fs -l /dev/sdd1 | grep -i 'block size'
Block size:               4096
11. stat

is a Linux command-line utility that displays detailed information about given files or file systems.

using stat command in the curent folder:

[email protected]:/srv/WD-2T-USB# stat .
  File: .
  Size: 69632           Blocks: 136        IO Block: 4096   directory
Device: 821h/2081d      Inode: 5           Links: 1
Access: (0644/-rw-r--r--)  Uid: (    1000/    userx)   Gid: (    1000/    userx)
Access: 2020-12-16 20:52:10.394697300 +0000
Modify: 2020-12-16 20:52:10.392883100 +0000
Change: 2020-12-16 20:52:10.392883100 +0000
 Birth: -

using stat command in the any path:

@ stat /dev/sda1
12. dumpe2fs

dump ext2/ext3/ext4 filesystem information; prints the super block and blocks group information for the filesystem present on device.
-h option displays only superblock information and not any of the detailed information about the block group descriptor:

@ dumpe2fs -h /dev/sdd1
dumpe2fs 1.45.5 (07-Jan-2020)
Filesystem volume name:   HGST-4TB
Last mounted on:          /srv/HGST-4T
Filesystem UUID:          4b98c45d-b7cf-4bbc-819e-7283b3f5247e
Filesystem magic number:  0xEF53
Filesystem revision #:    1 (dynamic)
Filesystem features:      has_journal ext_attr resize_inode dir_index filetype needs_recovery extent 64bit flex_bg sparse_super large_file huge_file dir_nlink extra_isize metadata_csum
Filesystem flags:         signed_directory_hash
Default mount options:    user_xattr acl
Filesystem state:         clean
Errors behavior:          Continue
Filesystem OS type:       Linux
Inode count:              244195328
Block count:              976754176
Reserved block count:     48837708
Free blocks:              904226234
Free inodes:              244195110
First block:              0
Block size:               4096
Fragment size:            4096
Group descriptor size:    64
Reserved GDT blocks:      1024
Blocks per group:         32768
Fragments per group:      32768
Inodes per group:         8192
Inode blocks per group:   512
Flex block group size:    16
Filesystem created:       Tue Dec 22 13:57:55 2020
Last mount time:          Wed Dec 23 14:41:50 2020
Last write time:          Wed Dec 23 14:44:23 2020
Mount count:              3
Maximum mount count:      -1
Last checked:             Tue Dec 22 13:57:55 2020
Check interval:           0 ()
Lifetime writes:          284 GB
Reserved blocks uid:      0 (user root)
Reserved blocks gid:      0 (group root)
First inode:              11
Inode size:               256
Required extra isize:     32
Desired extra isize:      32
Journal inode:            8
Default directory hash:   half_md4
Directory Hash Seed:      eea7c603-9c96-43ba-907b-ad22a23d3431
Journal backup:           inode blocks
Checksum type:            crc32c
Checksum:                 0x5a7626e9
Journal features:         journal_incompat_revoke journal_64bit journal_checksum_v3
Journal size:             1024M
Journal length:           262144
Journal sequence:         0x00000772
Journal start:            1
Journal checksum type:    crc32c
Journal checksum:         0x6761e6f7
13. e2label

Change disk label in linux/ubuntu using e2label command:

@ e2label /dev/sdf1 SAMSUNG-8T

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